Natural Resources

Preservation of Natural Resources is Essential for Energy Transfer’s Operations, Says Kelcy Warren

Energy Transfer, a firm that operates in 41 different states, is well-known for the extensive pipeline and energy holdings network that it maintains. But what some people may not know is that the Penn Virginia Operating Co., LLC, which is wholly owned by the parent company of Energy Transfer, is in charge of the management of about 675,000 acres of property in West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Virginia. This part of the operations includes the business of selling timber at retail, managing royalties from oil and gas production, and leasing land for use in agricultural and industrial endeavors.

The depletion of the mining sector in certain places has resulted in economic decline. However, under the leadership of Executive Chairman and co-founder Kelcy Warren, Energy Transfer’s Natural Resources Operations have helped to reverse this trend in important areas. This work encompasses 3,500 acres of land used for the cultivation of corn and soybeans, in addition to 1,200 acres used for the keeping of cattle.

Kelcy Warren states with great pride that Energy Transfer is one of the largest landowners in West Virginia, and that the operations of the company generate a significant amount of tax income for the state. He further commented that they acknowledge the weight of their role in administering natural resource operations in four different states and are devoted to conserving and restoring the region’s natural beauty.

Preserving Nature through Collaboration

“The preservation of our land is of great significance to us,” says Kelcy Warren. “Our certified foresters are responsible for administering forestry initiatives, tracking the growth of trees, and controlling timber activities on the nearly 249,000 acres of forest located in Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia. We make certain that all timber operations remain productive so that harvesting does not surpass the rate of development of the woodlands.

For a long time, we have worked with a variety of entities that have utilized our land for a multitude of objectives, ranging from college research to National Guard drills, and recreational activities such as clay shooting and hunting leases. Additionally, we have partnered with state and local governments in order to plan for industrial development which can generate new jobs and foster economic growth.

For over three decades, we’ve collaborated with Virginia Tech University to investigate the restoration of plant and tree types on land that was used for coal production as a component of the 1,000-acre Powell River Project. This endeavor has had an impact on the regulations and strategies for reclamation laid out by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.”

Farming of lavender on soil that has been previously used for mining purposes is becoming increasingly popular. This type of agricultural practice has been embraced in many parts of the world, and is seen as a way to bring life back to places that have been impacted by the mining industry.

The Appalachian Botanical Company, founded by Jocelyn Sheppard in 2018, is an example of Energy Transfer’s extraordinary leased land accomplishments. Set on reclaimed coal land in West Virginia, The Appalachian Botanical Company cultivates lavender and nurtures bee habitats, then turns their harvests into essential oils, lotions, and other health and wellness products. The company strives to accomplish two objectives: to offer a viable, financially secure way to restore mining areas and to create jobs for people with difficulties finding traditional employment that pays more than minimum wage.

The hardiness of lavender enables it to thrive even in the rocky ground typically found at former coal mining sites. This type of plant is able to survive without much water, is pest-resistant, and does not need a lot of fertilizer. The mining organization has remediated the area and conducted tests to confirm that the water and soil on the premises are pure and free of pollutants.

The Appalachian Botanical Company is presently cultivating 75 acres, and intends to expand. This offers a valuable opportunity for work in a region that has endured the displacement of countless jobs in the coal industry over the past decade. Sheppard has a long-term plan in mind, hoping to have a positive influence on the local area and become the greatest commercial-scale provider of lavender in the United States.

Christophe Rude
Christophe Rude
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