Common Grammatical Mistakes

Common Grammatical Mistakes Content Writers Need to Avoid

The first step to correcting your grammatical mistakes is to understand that you’re committing them. Remember, you can’t fix something that you simply aren’t conscious of. Know what you’re doing wrong and amend it immediately. If you’re editing your work, confirm that you simply review it countless times before publishing it online.

If you’ve got to read your text ten or twenty times to form sure that you simply capture all possible errors, do it! the sole problem is that it’s not efficient.

If you would like to save lots of yourself precious time correcting your grammatical mistakes, there are many reliable content tools out there to assist.

One excellent tool is Grammar Checker. It’s an AI-powered writing editor which will not only assist you to optimize your content for search but also check it for grammar and spelling issues.

Of course, there are “small” writing errors, like typographical or spelling errors, that readers can ignore. It’s forgivable, especially if readers will only see one or two misspelled words during a 1,500-word blog.

However small or large, one sloppy error is enough to wreck your reputation or cost you your credibility. What’s more, you don’t want the reader to urge hung abreast of a silly mistake and miss the purpose of your post.

There are some words and phrases which will sound perfectly fine in your head but make no sense when written down. What makes it worse is that if you – the author – fail to understand that there’s something wrong together with your work.

Again, it’s commonplace to overlook grammatical errors, particularly if you’re the one editing your work. But as a content writer, avoiding these writing mistakes is crucial.

Here are a number of these grammatical errors and the way you’ll correct or avoid them.

Grammatical Mistakes Content Writers Must Avoid

Using “they” when pertaining to an entity or brand

Using “they” to ask a business or entity may be a mistake many writers often make.

A business isn’t plural, and it’s not an individual. Therefore, you ought to use “it” or “its” when pertaining to one.

Example:

Wrong: Last week, ABC Enterprise announced that they might not offer refunds to customers who will return heavily damaged items.

Correct: Last week, ABC Enterprise announced that it might not offer refunds to customers who will return heavily damaged items.

(You can use “they” rather than “it” when you’re pertaining to multiple companies)

Passive Voice

Write sentences in active rather than passive to form them shorter and more alive.

Write sentences in active rather than passive to form them shorter and more alive. 

A passive sentence has the receiver of the action because the subject and therefore the doer of the action because the object. Below are some samples of sentences written within the passive voice:

  • The floor was sat on by the dog.
  • The business are going to be pack up permanently by the owners.
  • The criminals are being chased by the police.

Writing within the passive isn’t grammatically incorrect. it’s an article style utilized in cases when the doer of the action is unknown or irrelevant, or you’re talking about a few general truths.

However, passive sentences often sound wordy, indirect, and confusing. Remember, your favorite goal as a content writer is to speak your ideas in the clearest and most straightforward manner.

You can fix this issue by writing within the active instead. Let’s rewrite our examples above:

  • The dog sat on the ground.
  • The owners will pack up the business permanently.
  • The police chase the criminals.

The doer of the action has now become our subject and therefore the receiver, the thing. are you able to now see the difference?

Active sentences look alive and are shorter, making them easier to know. If you would like to form it easier for your target audiences to read your content, always consider writing within the active.

Dangling Modifiers

Dangling modifiers are among the foremost common grammatical mistakes that plague even seasoned writers. There are two reasons why modifiers dangle.

First is once you place the modifying words or phrases too faraway from the words that they’re meant to switch. Second is once you use modifiers albeit there are not any logical subjects to switch .

In both scenarios, the resulting sentences can confuse your readers. Here’s an example:

  • Jack was disappointed together with his son when he came home late that night.
  • Who came home late? Was it Jack or his son? Another example:
  • Going outside the space, the silence was deafening.

The sentence made it appear as if the silence went outside the space, which is physically impossible. the instance has no subject to switch, making the modifier dangle.

You can fix dangling modifiers by putting your modifiers on the brink of the words or phrases they modify. And also, by including or identifying a logical subject in your sentence.

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Christophe Rude

Christophe Rude

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