Best Beach Gear to Bring for Water Sports Activities in Asia

Asia boasts water sports across the length and breadth of the continent. Rafting on the rivers of Thailand, surfing the waves of the Phillippines, or stand up paddle boarding off the coast of Bali are just some of the most popular activities you can do. You could even do flying fish or parasailing if you’re really brave! Whatever water sport you practise, you’ll need equipment. For something like swimming, it’ll be nothing more than a swimsuit and some goggles. However, for board sports, you’re likely to need more than the board itself!

In this post, we’ll take a look at some essential gear for doing water sports in Asia. That should help you decide what to bring with you, and what you can leave at home. Let’s check it out. 

Swimming

Let’s start off with an easy one. Swimming needs a swimsuit and goggles. If you’re somewhere known for rich marine biodiversity, like the Tioman Islands in Malaysia, or Koh Tao in Thailand, then bring a snorkel too. 

One thing to be aware of when swimming is strong currents. It’s always best to swim at beaches which have designated swimming areas and/or lifeguards. 

Stand up paddle boarding

SUP is becoming more and more popular across the world and Asia is no exception. Whether it’s on lakes, rivers, or at the beach, here’s what you need.

Stand up Paddle Board

You can’t SUP without a paddleboard! While you can rent a paddle board (a good option if you’re a beginner), regular paddle boarders could soon start to see rental costs building up. If that’s the case, consider buying your own. iSUPs are great for all-round use and they can easily be transported and inflated on the move. 

If you have a discipline in mind, such as SUP yoga, touring, or surfing, then you can buy purpose built boards for these too. 

Paddle

You’ll need a paddle too. The best and most flexible option is a height adjustable paddle, which can come in a range of materials. All rounders and beginners should find no trouble using an aluminium paddle, though competitive paddlers may choose a lighter material, such as carbon fibre. 

PFD 

A PFD is not so much ‘best beach gear’ as essential in some places, such as Hong Kong. A paddle board is considered a water vessel there, so you’ll need a PFD to use yours legally. It’s nothing more than a small device that will keep you afloat if you fall into the water. Get a compact one to fit around your waist and you’ll hardly even notice it! Bring a PDF for your dog as well.

Leash

Your leash is another important safety device. Like the PFD, it only springs into action if you fall into the water. This one will keep you tethered to the board so you don’t lose it in rough seas. SUP leashes are longer and thicker than those used for surfing, so make sure not to mix the two up. 

Surfing

Another popular board sport across Asia, surfing has a few must haves that you can bring from home rather than spending money on renting! 

Surfboard

If you’re flying to Asia, you’ll have to balance the cost of renting a board against how much it costs to transport on the aeroplane. If you have the cash, do it. There’s nothing quite as good as using your own board! 

Leash

Remember that your surf leash is shorter but thinner than a SUP leash. It’s important not to mix the two up, as either could snap in the water if tethered to the wrong board. 

Scuba Diving

Asia has some of the world’s most biodiverse waters and the best way to see them is through scuba diving. But what should you pack or rent?

Mask

Ever tried opening your eyes in a swimming pool? Hurts, doesn’t it. Imagine that in salt water! Diving without a mask is pretty much unheard of – so get a high quality and comfortable mask to make the most of your scuba session. 

Wetsuit

Okay, scuba diving isn’t the only water sport in Asia you could use a wetsuit for. But it is one of the very few where it’s essential year-round. Water temperature drops rapidly once you get out of the sun, so be sure to protect yourself with a wetsuit, or in really cold waters, a drysuit. Both are quite inconvenient to carry around, so consider renting. 

Fins

Fins can help you be quicker and more agile as you swim through the water. Choose between open heel and full foot fins – it’s best to get the one you find more comfortable.

Beach Essentials

Even if you’re just chilling out on the beach, there are some items you shouldn’t forget for your trip. Here are a couple of essentials you shouldn’t leave out of your backpack or duffel bag! 

Sunscreen

Sunscreen is essential on an Asian beach vacation. Be sure to have a factor that adequately protects your skin and re-apply it regularly. Reef-safe sunscreen is best in the water as it does not damage coral or other marine life. 

An alternative to using sunscreen on your upper body is a rash guard. This water-resistant tee not only stops UV rays but surf rashes too.

Microfibre Towel

Taking a towel to the beach is necessary, but it can be a pain if you have a large beach or bath towel. It’s much better to pack a microfibre towel. They can be folded up into super-small spaces, and the fact that they dry instantly won’t damage or make your other belongings damp.

Share your love
Christophe Rude

Christophe Rude

Articles: 15885

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *