5 Common Reasons for SQL Server Database Corruption

Dealing with a corrupted SQL database can be tough. Hence it makes sense to know about possible causes which can lead to database corruption. In this article, we look at 5 common reasons for SQL Server database corruption. 

Most mid to large-sized firms work with several databases for every instance of SQL Server they implement and sometimes the number of databases can run into hundreds. The sheer number of databases in use leaves open the possibility of errors cropping up in some database or the other. Dealing with a corrupted SQL Server database can be a challenging task even for the most seasoned database administrator.  Given the fact that incidents of data corruption in SQL databases are a fairly common occurrence in firms where hundreds of databases are in use, it makes sense to do all that can be done to prevent such mishaps. Let’s look at the 5 most common causes that contribute to SQL Server database corruption.

Improper Shutdown or Power Outage

One of the most common causes behind corruption of SQL Server database files can be attributed to improper shutdown due to any cause including a power outage. This is more common in small firms running the SQL Server express edition without failsafe options. 

Issues in the SQL Application including Update issues

In some cases, the SQL Server application may include bugs that can lead to database corruption under certain circumstances. At times while you are upgrading a database from an older iteration of the SQL Server application to a new edition, incidents of data corruption can be noticed. Such incidents can also occur when you are migrating a database from the SQL Server Express edition to the Standard edition. 

Virus Attacks

The SQL Server database files are often the target of malicious programs looking to compromise the database. Typically such viruses try to compromise the header data in the underlying MDF file. In the recent past, incidents of ransomware attacks compromising SQL Server databases too have come to light. 

Poor Database Design and Resource Conflicts

While designing a database one needs to lay emphasis on follow ideal design practices related to normalization, correct use of constraints, etc. A poorly designed database containing redundant data is relatively more vulnerable to database corruption. Resource conflicts too can lead to incidents of data corruption in SQL Server files.

Plethora of Hardware Issues

A plethora of hardware-related issues can lead to the compromise of MDF data files. These include hard disk crashes, faulty network equipment, bad memory card, etc. In small firms that use low-end machines to run SQL Server editions, instances of hardware failure are more common.

Dealing with SQL Server Corruption in an Effective Manner

When you notice a corrupted SQL Server database file, it is strongly advised to avoid experimenting with the application to recover the data. The best way forward for you would involve running the powerful DataNumen SQL Recovery application to extract the contents from the compromised file. From triggers and indexes present in the SQL database files to inline functions and even views; there is hardly anything that this tool cannot completely recover. It is miles ahead in recovery rates as compared to its peers and can handle nearly every media type. The application also comes in handy in recovering any deleted data elements like tables etc. from a compromised database file. 

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Christophe Rude

Christophe Rude

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